Bipolar patient develops mHealth app to help track mood disorders

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Mood Watch, a cross-platform mobile health app created by a bipolar patient and endorsed by the International Bipolar Foundation, is now available in the App Store and Android Marketplace to help people who suffer from mood disorders to track their feelings in order to better understand behavioral patterns, according to an announcement from MarketWire.

Available for the iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Android devices, the app enables users to track several times daily how they feel mentally, emotionally and physically by answering a short set of questions. By using Mood Watch, users can rate their anxiety level, mood, level of calmness, focus/mindfulness and energy level three times a day.

At the end of the week, a report can be generated detailing all the information entered using the app. These reports can then be printed out or emailed to a physician or therapist for further discussion, "providing insight into a person's mood changes over time."

In addition, the app allows users to enter the names of the supplements or medications they are taking, and set alarms to go off throughout the day to help ensure they are following their regimen as planned or as directed by a physician.

In related mobile apps for moods news, the Department of Defense recently added new features to its smartphone application designed to monitor a soldier's long-term emotional health. The mobile app, called the T2 Mood Tracker, now enables users to send their personal information to their home computers and to share it with their healthcare providers.

The app, which is used in conjunction with therapy, records a range of emotions for anxiety, depression, head injury, stress, post-traumatic stress and a user's general well-being. The data, which is saved in a graphical or spreadsheet format, is then transferred via e-mail or other wireless connection to a patient's therapist.

To learn more:
- read the announcement

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