Latest Commentary

The missed opportunity regarding wearables

There is continuous dialogue and discourse about engaging consumers and patients when it comes to mobile healthcare technology. A good majority--well nearly all of it--tends to target...

Partnerships a sure-fire way to entrench mHealth

There's a terrific story this week in mHealth--and it's one every healthcare insurance company and healthcare provider should put on its must-read list. After they read it, then it's time...

Apple-IBM mobile health apps: Just what the nurse ordered

Last year, I wrote a commentary proclaiming it was time to tech-mobilize the hardest working segment in healthcare: the nursing staff. What a difference a year makes.

Why wearables may not be the future of patient care

I took the plunge into the wearable device pool two weeks ago, getting myself a tool that promises to help track my activity levels and sleep patterns while offering insight on how best I can develop a healthier lifestyle. Sadly, though, my initial feedback is more negative than positive. And given all I hear about the promise of wearables to transform healthcare--and the federal government's recent push to incentivize doctors to use more patient-generated data via such devices in their efforts--this is not a good sign.

Payer apps: An epic fail

There is a startling, and greatly disappointing, research report out regarding healthcare insurance companies and mobile app development. In a simple summary, this how the report describes such efforts: Epic fail.

Why small feats equal huge mHealth wins

When I called to make a medical appointment for my 92-year-old father this week, the receptionist said she would be sending out the pre-visit paperwork required for first-time patients....

Apple Watch is an mHealth disappointment--so far

Monday was a big day for Apple. But not such a big day for those of us eager to discover what Apple can do when it comes to developing an mHealth wearable device. That's because for the most part, we still don't know what Apple can do with wearable mHealth tech. Apple's Watch, available next month, barely offers what could be described as mHealth functionality.

BYOD security: Where hospitals must focus their efforts

While healthcare facilities are slowly issuing mobile devices to staff and caregiver teams, it's not happening as rapidly as some would like. To that end, many healthcare professionals increasingly are tapping their own personal smartphones and mobile computing devices to help them do their jobs.

That, however, creates a big problem: the security issue (or lack thereof) when it comes to the information being shared, patient data being stored, images being housed, etc. One lost device, one misstep in emailing confidential data, a laptop stolen from a locker or a nurse's station means tremendous liability and legal headaches, not to mention the fallout in consumer trust.

Blurred lines not a good anthem for mHealth regulation

Before the Federal Trade Commission or Food and Drug Administration tackle another mobile health technology investigation, the two federal agencies--both of which are charged with protecting consumers--need to huddle up in a conference room, lock the door and not come out until they produce a clear map of what they're responsible for when it comes to oversight and regulating such tools.

Why? Because right now it's getting quite difficult to figure out who's keeping on eye on the shallow end of the mobile health technology pool and who's watching the deep end.